ns1

Zika virus NS1 crystallographic structure reveals diversity of electrostatic surfaces among flaviviruses

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Zika Virus and Birth Defects — Reviewing the Evidence for Causality

On the basis of this review, we conclude that a causal relationship exists between prenatal Zika virus infection and microcephaly and other serious brain anomalies.

April 14, 2016

nejmsr1604338_t1

homolgy

Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus

Several suggested steps have been proposed which could be taken to initiate ZIKV antiviral drug discovery using both high throughput screens as well as structure-based design based on homology models for the key proteins. We now describe preliminary homology models created for NS5, FtsJ, NS4B, NS4A, HELICc, DEXDc, peptidase S7, NS2B, NS2A, NS1, E stem, glycoprotein M, propeptide, capsid and glycoprotein E using SWISS-MODEL.

May 5, 2016

Illustrating and homology modeling the proteins of the Zika virus – F1000Research

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myelitis

Acute myelitis due to Zika virus infection

gb

Guillain-Barré Syndrome outbreak associated with Zika virus infection in French Polynesia: a case-control study

This is the first study providing evidence for Zika virus infection causing Guillain-Barré syndrome. Because Zika virus is spreading rapidly across the Americas, at risk countries need to prepare for adequate intensive care beds capacity to manage patients with Guillain-Barré syndrome.

May 1, 2016

gr1

Figure: Weekly cases of suspected Zika virus infections and Guillain-Barré syndrome in French Polynesia between October, 2013, and April, 2014
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The Zika Virus: What You Need to Know

Here are a few answers to some questions that many Americans may have about the Zika disease and who it could impact.
February 26, 2016

The Zika Virus: What You Need to Know | whitehouse.gov

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bbc_uganda

Zika virus: Inside Uganda’s forest where the disease originates

Only two cases of the virus have been confirmed in Uganda in the past seven decades. This is because the types of mosquitoes that would transmit the virus to humans don’t often come into contact with the general population, says Dr Julius Lutwama, a leading virologist at the Uganda Virus Research Institute. “The Aedes we have, Aedes aegypti formosus, normally does not bite humans. And then we have other [mosquitoes] which live in the forests and prefer to bite at dusk and dawn,” Dr Lutwama adds. This is in contrast to Latin America, where a different sub species, Aedes aegypti aegypti, is spreading the Zika virus.

bbc_uganda

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